Archive for September, 2013

Tigerwood Dock

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

Do it right the first time. Building a dock, which will be exposed to water and weather on a regular basis, requires careful planning of the construction and material choices to use. Docks are naturally difficult to construct because of the water surrounding them and pilings to which they  attach. This is why building a dock right the first time is so important. If you choose the best materials the first time around, then you can rest easy knowing it will outlast inferior materials. You will avoid costly and incessant repairs year after year. If you invest more on your dock the first time around, but it lasts twice as long and you do not spend your spring and summer every year on nagging repair work, then you are much better off. Time is money; free time is invaluable!  Save yourself the headache and do it right the first time. In addition to  the benefit of enjoying longer-lasting materials,, these materials also are much more beautiful.. Tigerwood is just such a superior choice for this application. Tigerwood’s density makes it an ideal choice material for marine applications. It will outlast softwoods, even pressure treated, by leaps and bounds. You can see from the pictures below how much more beautiful it is than a lower quality pine or pressure treated deck. Aside from its beauty, you will enjoy Tigerwoods integrity as it will outlast inferior materials two fold. It also provides a safer walking surface for tender feet as a result of its tight grain and resistance to warping and splintering.

Majestic Tigerwood Deck on Texas Lake copy

tigerwood dock

Gazebo Vs. Pergola

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

What is the difference between a Gazebo and a Pergola? Maybe you know the difference but are trying to decide which you prefer for your home. While both offer a stunning edition to your outdoor living area, they possess slightly different characteristics  that impact the lifestyle and use of your new addition. Historically, the gazebo was commonly mentioned in Chinese and Persian literature. Gazebos  are commonly seen today in England as well and date back as far as the late 1800′s. Gazebos  generally have fully roofed tops and open sides. Gazebos offer more protection from rain and sun than pergolas. Gazebos are commonly built with an octagonal design and  a raised deck in the center. Benches around the inside of a gazebo and screens for the sides are simple enhancements to make your living space more comfortable and to keep pesky insects away..

Pergolas developed around the same era and, like gazebos, some built in the 1800’s still exist today The  word “pergola” comes from the Latin word “pergula” which meant “lecture room, school with protruding roof with vines.”. Pergolas often extend from one building to another and are closely related to gardening as many pergolas provide a path for vines to grow along. Pergolas are generally less robust then gazebos and only provide limited concealment from sun and rain. Although they could, pergolas do not normally have a deck constructed below like the gazebo. Lattice is an inexpensive solution to create a perforated canopy on top of the pergola. The construction of a modern pergola that most directly comes to mind is a four post style with outer beams and cross members in the center. Along a poolside or over a green and meticulously managed outdoor living space are two of the most beautiful locations to construct a new pergola. Some are constructed of wrought Iron, some of brick or concrete and some of wood. Wood is the most common and is a green alternative to other building materials. Below are several pictures of gazebos and pergolas.

pergolas

ipe pergola

gazebos